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River She-Oak (Casuarina Cunninghamiana) 25+ seeds

River She-Oak (Casuarina Cunninghamiana) 25+ seeds
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GERMINATION INSTRUCTIONS
We always include printed germination instructions.

River Sheoak is a highly successful, tall, narrow evergreen tree that will grow on many various sites, as long as waterlogging is not constant. It will survive on heavy clay soils or sands . Typically it grows to between 15-20m tall, is up to 6m wide and forms a strong, buttressed trunk. The root systems are vigorous and matted, and it can be difficult to grow turf or other plants under these trees.
River Sheoak will form a picturesque, shaggy tree within 10 years of planting, with the elegant, strongly pendulous branchlets to 15cm. It looks best when planted in groves, clumps or as a screening plant. It responds well to pruning, and can be coppiced each 5+ years to form a dense screen.
Although it is a valuable tree for nature-like landscapes. It is highly successful either as a clump-growing display tree or as a screen. (source: metrotrees.com.au).

Genus - Casuarina
Species - Cunninghamiana
Common name - River She-Oak
Pre-Treatment - Not-required
Hardiness zones - 9 - 10
Height - 60' / 18 m
Plant type - Medium Tree
Vegetation type - Evergreen
Exposure - Full Sun, Partial Shade
Growth rate - Fast
Soil PH - Acidic, Neutral, Alkaline
Soil type - Light (sandy), medium (loamy), heavy (clay), well-drained soil
Water requirements - Average Water
Germination rate - 70%
Bloom season - End of spring
Leaf / Flower color - Green / --

Useful Info
GerminationSeed - sow late winter to early summer in a greenhouse and only just cover the seed.
When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. (source: www.pfaf.org)